ROOSA & PELS LINES continued

INDEX

FOURTEENTH GENERATION

8288. Goert (Heymens Rosa?)

8289. unknown

NOTE: Peace court records for Bank van Tuil 1564 - 1572 (Folio 1242) list Goirt Heijmenss 23v; for 1551 - 1563 (Folio 1241) lists Geurt Heymens 267. -- c/o Marco Schelling" marcoschelling@interimnl.com

8290. Alert /Alart Dirksen

8291. Aricken /Arichen unknown

  • b. ABT 1544
  • Family: (8290) Alert Dirksen
  • i. (4145) Maria Alertse
  • ii. Buuyster Alarts (male)
    • (b. ABT 1565) of Rumpt
  • iii. Dirck Alerts
    • (b. ABT 1570) of Gorinchem, Tiel, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • iv. Beert (Alertse) (female)
    • (b. ABT 1575)
    • m. Aert Anthonissen
      • b. ABT 1570 Netherlands

8292. Theunis Jansz Kuijsten

8293. unknown

8294. Aernout Willemsz

8295. unknown

8296. Adrian De Jongh

8297. unknown

REF: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6630/dejonghfam.html

FIFTEENTH GENERATION

16576. poss. Heimen /Heymen (Rosa)

16577. unknown

Sephardic Jewish Origins of the ROOSA Family

"Have you ever been in contact with either `Bureau voor Historisch Onderzoek, Zutphen' or `rijksarchief in Gelderland'? One of our Canadian cousins did, and sent me a photocopy of stuff they sent her in Dutch and Old Dutch... the Roosa name appears often and dates in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest date that appears on a page along with the Roosa name is 1440..."
 

So began a heated discussion about the origins of our Roosa family: Some said they descended from Jewish refugees who fled Portugal for the lower Rhine valley around 1530, and others claimed that the family was indigenous to the Netherlands. John Hope entered the fray, quoting the late Sullivan County historian, Bert S. Feldman:

 
"`Gomez family history detailed'

"`In your Sunday magazine supplement of May 19, you ran an article on the Gomez House in Orange County. Named after one of the earliest settlers in the Newburgh area, Luis (not Louis) Moses Gomez, this building and mill is the oldest known Jewish settlement in the United States. Unfortunately, there were several errors in this long-overdue tale of early New York history. First, Gomez was not a Spanish immigrant; he was a citizen of Holland, as were many of his co-religionists in the Hudson Valley, men such as Emmanuel Gonsaulus (the earliest known settler's grave in Sullivan County), the Fonsecas in the Poughkeepsie area and the Roosas, a rabbinical family...'

"Bert S. Feldman of Mongaup Valley is deputy historian for Sullivan County, historian for the town of Bethel and teaches Sullivan County history at Sullivan County Community College." (5)...

"3) Frederic Rosa (CLFB67A-Prodigy)... Goshen Sunday Record, June 2, 1996, p. 31"

-- John Hope johnehope@prodigy.net Mr. Feldman died on 2 Feb. 1999.

"Some unknown and unsung heroes" -- By BERT FELDMAN

"...The Jews, expelled in 1492, fled to more hospitable lands, especially Holland. They came to Nieuw Amsterdam in 1654 and built a synagogue near Wall St., the second oldest religious body in that Dutch Colony. (The Dutch Reformed Church was the first.) The records of that synagogue, Congregation Shearith Israel, are still in existence but at a different location. They show that many of that group ventured up the Hudson Valley to trade with the Lenapes. Luis Moses Gomez was among the first settlers of Newburgh; his home and mill are still standing and open as a museum north of that city. There were numerous Emanuel Gonsauluses (the Portuguese variation of Gonzalez) in the Kingston area, along with other congregates such as Fonseca and Rossa... (sic)"

-- http://riverreporter.com/issues/98-01-01/01bert2.htm
 

Mr. Feldman died before I could confirm his sources; but since he was Jewish, I am confident that he knew which families were "rabbinical". Others then brought up the matter of an Eighteenth Century family historian who acknowledged the legend of Iberian descent, but nonetheless did not believe it -- all this, apparently, from a 1941 NYGBR article:

 
"An excerpt from "An Armory of American Families of Dutch Descent... Roosa" reads: "In the article dealing with the van Gaesbeck family, there was a genealogical and heraldic manuscript of the 18th century that was authored by Gysbert Van Ryckhuysen of Leiden. This city official was a native of Herwynen, province of Gelderland, and his parents were Arien Van Ryckhuysen and Jenneke Ariens Roosa...

"The notes start with Aeldert Roosa who lived at Herwynen in the first half of the seventeenth century. His given name was Aeldert, the fact that he was a resident of Herwynen and that, in addition, his son, Geurt, married in 1638 to Engeltie Ariens De Jongh, the daughter of Burgomaster Arien De Jongh, is incontestable proof that he was a very close relative of the progenitor of the American family of Aeldert Hymanse Roosa (born 1621) from Herwynen who with his wife, Wyntjie Ariens de Jongh, a sister of the above Engeltie, arrived on these shores in 1660. It would seem that the American settler's father, Heyman Roosa, may have been a brother of Aeldert Roosa.

"The genealogy mentions a somewhat mythical descent for the family, namely that they had fled on account of religious persecutions from the town of Roosa in Spain. (Modern day map indicates a town of Reus in the province of Tarragona near the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, about 120 miles south of France). The pedigree originated at a time when the majority of the Dutch families preferred a descent from foreign lands rather than acknowledging their less illustrious hard-working Dutch forebears who by their industry had made their more opulent descendants ancestor-conscious. Even Van Ryckhuysen doubted the truth of these statements and suggested (italics mine) that it was a family, possibly originally named De Roos, which had lived many generations at Herwynen. The genealogy gives the arms of the family: three roses - Gules. No crest is mentioned. These arms are, therefore, those of the American family."

-- from R. Rosa ROOSAROOST@aol.com
 

To some, the fact that one family historian thought that another family historian's account was "somewhat mythical", was the last word on the matter. Other sources tended to uphold Bert Feldman's assertion that the Roosa roots were Jewish. The bottom line is; the family tradition, of the Roosas coming from Spain, dates from the early days of their settlement in America.

 
"Sephardic Names Reference List

"All names in this list are a result of a compilation of four lists (of Jewish victims of the Spanish Inquisition)... For the "L" link: This list was compiled by LusaWeb (http://www.lusaweb.com/Genealogy/)with the help of Harry Stein... For the "I" link: Compiled by Rabbi Haim Levi: http://www.ifmj.org/publish.htm

"...da Rosa (L); ...Rosa (L); ...Roza (I)"

-- http://ifmj.org/pdf/sephardic_surnames

"A Roosa Family Bible Record"

"Aleardt, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herweyen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Heywennen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles sontheast of Arnhem... From the fact that in Gelderland at the present time the language of its people is interspersed with Spanish words and idioms it has been supposed that many religious refugees from Spain during the first years of the Inquisition settled in this particular Province of Holland, among whom may have been ancestors of Albert Heymanse; if so, this can account for the spelling of the name, by the Hollanders-Roose -which to them would produce the same sound as Rosa, his name in Spanish.

-- http://www.hopefarm.com/roosa.htm

"An Inquiry into the Wealth of the Rural Population of the Bommeler And Tielerward"

"...Most of the population (of Herwijnen) belonged to the Reformed Church but there were, in 1844, ten Catholic families and twenty-five Jews. The first preacher, Johannes Godefridus Coxius, is reported to have come in 1610..."

--Gens Nostra

"Professors unravel land buys in 17th century N. Dutchess"

By Harvey Auster

Rhinebeck -- On a June day 300 years ago, three settlers from the Wiltwyck (Kingston) area made a deal with some Indians for land on the east shore of the Hudson River across from Rondout Creek. Their rationale seems strangely modern to people who have watched land values in the Hudson Valley skyrocket in recent years. The three, Gerrit Artsen and Jan Elton [Elting], together with a Portugese Jew named (518) Arie Roosa, purchased the land from the Indians as speculators hoping to cash in on future development, according to two professors whose field of expertise is the Indians of New York. State University College at New Paltz: history professor Laurence Hauptman and Ohio University anthropology professor Robert Grumet agreed that both the Europeans and the three members of the Esopus tribe lived on the west side of the river principally...

-- johnehope@prodigy.net
 

This was the situation a few years ago, when I was struggling to sort out the family history. One researcher even admitted that her father spoke of the Roosas as coming from Portugal, yet she was adamant that the family was native Dutch. The matter remains unresolved, but anyone researching it is bound to encounter adamant opinions.

  The most conclusive evidence of a Spanish connection for the Roosas of Herwijnen is found in heraldry. The Roosa coat of arms was three red roses on a gold background, with a rose coming from the helmet on the upper side. The shield is identical to that of the Rosique family of Murcia, Eastern Andalucia, Spain
REF: http://grandesp.org.uk/heraldica/herald_en4.htm

"The original is said to have been painted on glass in the house of origin of the Roosa, ...A Nice copy was kept by Jacob Jansz Rosa, gatekeeper of the Mare gate in Leyden with the name `Cornelis Roosa' under it"

-- Treffers, "Geslacht Boorn der family Roosa of 1738"

The probable yDNA of (1036) Aldert Roosa is shown below. The haplogroup is "R1b", which is common in Western Europe, especially in Spain. A large percentage of Sephardic Jews are of this haplogroup, along with the majority of West Europeans. The reported rates for Jewish R1b are at least 12% among Sephardim and approx. 3-4% for Ashkenazim. Claims have been repeatedly posted on the Internet denying this connection, but they are incorrect. I am not speaking on this matter as an amateur: I have a Master's Degree in Chemistry, and will be glad to direct you to an appropriate websites if you have a some question about this.

Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman & Donald Panther-Yates, in "Toward a Sephardic Haplogroup Profile in the New World", an article submitted to the International Journal of Sephardic Studies, compare haplogroup profiles from Canary Islands, Azores, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico, New Mexico and the Appalachians (Melungeons and Cumberland Gap) and suggest that "R1b is far and away the most prevalent haplogroup in Sephardic Jewish populations". They surmise that its dominant position is likely the result of major conversion events in Southern France and Northern Spain about 1200 years ago.

-- http://dnaconsultants.com/Detailed/355.html

Table REF: http://www.ysearch.org/lastname_view.asp?uid=&letter=&lastname=roosa&viewuid=J6D5J&p=0

Hg

DYS
393

DYS
390

DYS
19

DYS
391

DYS
385a

DYS
385b

DYS
426

DYS
388

DYS
439

DYS
389-1

DYS
392

DYS
389-2

DYS
458

DYS
459a

DYS
459b

DYS
455

DYS
454

DYS
447

DYS
437

DYS
448

DYS
449

DYS
464a

DYS
464b

DYS
464c

DYS
464d

Herwijnen ROOSA Modal Haplotype; subset of Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype

R1b

13

24

14

11

11

14

12

12

12

13

13

29

18

9

10

11

11

25

15

19

28

15

15

16

16

16580. Dirk unknown

16581. unknown

16584. Jan Kuijsten

16585. unknown

REF: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=elsien57&id=I24652 c/o Linda Newhouse elsien57@yahoo.com

16592. Adrian De Jongh

16593. unknown

REF: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6630/dejonghfam.html

Jonge -- The history of this ancient North Holland family traces its ancestry as a family of Netherlands origin before the year 1100

"I have tried, so far in vain, to trace the origin of this De Jongh family back to the De Jongh family of Ghent and Bruges, where their arms were registered as early as 1280, one of the patrician families of Flanders. It is my belief, however, that we do spring from that origin, where the letter "h" in our name had its origin. The families of the name in Holland origin rarel;y used the letter "h". In Herwijnen, and elsewhere, these de Jonghs generally held official positions where they resided.

"The great grandson of ...Ds. Martinus Adrianuse De Jongh has quite a story on the family in "Navorscher", published in 1904... In that article, written by M. J. De Jongh, is described the physical characteristics of his forefathers as large and well-built type, keen-minded men, of zealous and crusading nature. Longevity he states also was common among them, and they had a fiery delivery as ministers. That corresponds with other data I have collected on other branches of this De Jongh family of Herwijnen and even in my own branch longevity and zealousness in a cause have been outstanding traits."

-- Carol Johnson REF: http://www.flash.net/~mscott/html/yz.htm

INDEX

= siblings

Return to Generation Four